CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin said Monday the U.S. Bureau of Prisons' transfer of out-of-state inmates to West Virginia was a "reckless decision" after one of the federal prisoners tested positive for the coronavirus.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin said Monday the U.S. Bureau of Prisons' transfer of out-of-state inmates to West Virginia was a "reckless decision" after one of the federal prisoners tested positive for the coronavirus.
The inmate was among 124 sent to the Federal Correctional Institution at Gilmer from the U.S. Marshals Service on April 28. None showed symptoms of the virus when they arrived at the medium-security prison in the city of Glenville, the Bureau of Prisons said in a statement.
During routine temperature checks Friday, the inmate had a fever and other symptoms including a cough, body aches and a loss of appetite, the statement said. The inmate was sent to a hospital, where he tested positive for the virus.
The statement said he was returned to the prison Saturday and placed in isolation.
Manchin and other officials had asked the Bureau of Prisons last month to reconsider the planned transfers to Glenville and to the federal prison at Hazelton.
"This is what we feared would happen," Manchin said in a statement. "This reckless decision on the part of BOP has endangered our hardworking correctional officers and their families, the entire community and the other inmates in the facility."
Manchin said he has asked the Bureau of Prisons to investigate and that additional transfers be stopped.
Bureau of Prisons Director Michael Carvajal has said 10 sites across the country with available bed space were identified to house the new inmates, a move to relieve overcrowding. Carvajal said inmates who don't test positive for the virus after a 14-day quarantine will then be transported to their designated prisons.
It wasn't immediately known when inmates would be sent to Hazelton. Bureau of Prisons spokeswoman Sue Allison said last week that "no further movement to quarantine sites is scheduled at this time."
The inmates had been screened and had their temperatures checked several times, including before boarding their flight, after landing and after arriving at the prison. The Bureau of Prisons statement did not mention whether the inmates wore masks during the trip or were tested for COVID-19.
Justin Tarovisky, executive vice president of a union local representing guards at Hazelton, said the inmates were not tested for COVID-19 before their arrival at the Glenville prison.
"It doesn't make any sense whatsoever," Tarovisky said. "All they're doing is temperature swabbing them on the top of their heads. By CDC guidelines, unless you know and are testing them, you shouldn't be moving them."
He said buses from the Hazelton prison were used to pick up the inmates from an undisclosed location.
After the inmate's positive test was disclosed, the bus crew was placed in quarantine at the union's request, Tarovisky said.
Republican Gov. Jim Justice, who also opposed the inmate transfers, did not address the inmate's positive test during his regular conference call Monday, and an email sent to his spokesman was not immediately returned.
About 1,200 people in West Virginia have the virus after more than 54,000 tests, according to the state health department. At least 50 people have died.
For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up within weeks. For some, especially older adults and those with existing health problems, it can bring about more severe illness and even death.