KEYSER - Two remaining businesses in Beryl are in a similar situation as Piedmont when it comes to needing an ongoing water service following the closure of Verso Paper Company.

By Jean Braithwaite
Tribune Correspondent
KEYSER - Two remaining businesses in Beryl are in a similar situation as Piedmont when it comes to needing an ongoing water service following the closure of Verso Paper Company.
Kingsford Manufacturing Company and Kessel Mulch will have their water supply from Verso turned off within months, and plans are being made to keep the businesses open.
Kevin Clark, executive director of the Mineral County Development Authority, approached the subject of the water supply for the businesses during the recent agency’s meeting.
He said that options to keep a water supply available for the businesses could happen with a source from the Bloomington water system or by having tanks installed in the ground to store a water supply.
Clark said that right now, “Kingsford is drilling wells to keep things going,” adding that the company has a priority to have “good potable water for the employees.”
He also mentioned that assistance is being sought from Region 8 Planning and Development for writing a grant for the project.
In another business item for the development authority, Mineral County commissioner Richard Lechliter, gave an update on the North/South Route 220 Corridor Project as discussed during Mineral County Day at Charleston.
He said about the event, “It was one of the best,” of having Mineral County Day, and, “We had good communication with the various state departments.”
Lechliter said that a meeting took place with one of the governor’s assistants, and he received information that the North/South Highway Project was not on the top ten list of state’s highway projects to gain the go ahead for a start date.
Buck Eagle, development board member, was dismayed with that piece of news, and said, “This is most alarming that the state didn’t know of this project.”
This highway project will connect I-68 in Allegany County, Maryland to Corridor H in Grant County.
Lechliter said that an upcoming happening in the schedule for the corridor project is a study of a pathway along the proposed route of the corridor covering 4,000 feet that could revel such items as caves, cemeteries, bat population, and any hidden things.
Following this study, a public hearing is scheduled, followed by the compiling of gathered information, which could take a year.
Lechliter said when the report is finalized, “It will show where the highway will go.”