KEYSER, W.Va. – Mineral County is pleased to announce that Katherine Capaldi, a mathematics teacher at Keyser High School, has been selected for participation in Mountaineer Mathematics Master Teachers (M3T), a partnership between the West Virginia University College of Education and Human Services and Pocahontas County Schools supported by a $177,000 grant by the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation for the 2019-2020 school year.

KEYSER, W.Va. – Mineral County is pleased to announce that Katherine Capaldi, a mathematics teacher at Keyser High School, has been selected for participation in Mountaineer Mathematics Master Teachers (M3T), a partnership between the West Virginia University College of Education and Human Services and Pocahontas County Schools supported by a $177,000 grant by the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation for the 2019-2020 school year.
“We are excited to welcome the M3T pilot program to Keyser High School,” said KHS principal Lois Spencer (principal) and assistant principal TJ Connor.
“Last year our 11th grade students exceeded the goal set forth on their state SAT math score. Miss Capaldi’s teaching helped make this happen. This year, her initiative to find and bring this program to KHS gives us hope to increase our student math skills even more and in all grades.
“The program will include several math teachers in our county, with Miss Capaldi serving as lead. This will allow KHS to network with not only Keyser Middle School, Frankfort High School, and Frankfort Middle School, but also with Pocahontas, Grant, Fayette, Randolph and Gilmer counties. The best part of the program is in the future, Burt-Kinderman’s theory can be applied across curriculums.”
As part of the program, Capaldi will work with Matthew Campbell, an assistant professor of secondary mathematics at WVU, and Joanna Burt-Kinderman, who was recognized as one of Education Week’s 2019 Leaders to Learn From for her work as a mathematics instructional coach in Pocahontas County. The project team is joined by Kirk Walters, director of math education research and evaluation at WestEd, who brings experience in growing an improvement network of mathematics teachers across New England in the Better Math Teaching Network.
The project team will provide this group of teachers with the tools they need to implement meaningful changes in their classrooms based on the methods Burt-Kinderman uses. The program model asks teachers to identify specific problems in their mathematics classrooms, develop methods for addressing those problems reflected in research, and iteratively test and measure those new methods toward improvements.
“It is incredibly inspiring to see so many teachers in Mineral County excited to join me in this work to learn from and with one another,” said Capaldi. “I have already seen a growth and utilized the tools provided to me as a way to reflect upon my classroom practice and work towards improvement in myself.
“In addition, I am grateful to work with Amy Cowgill, Sue Haustrath, Sarah Malone, Stacey McClintock, and Amy Rice as fellow Mineral County teacher leaders, and I am learning so much from them! This is an incredible opportunity for secondary teachers in Mineral County to work together in order to improve mathematics education from the ground up. I would like to thank my district leadership and WVDE Math4Life for their support of this work.”
According to Burt-Kinderman, this approach to professional development for educators runs counter to more traditional approaches in which researchers or experts present a way of teaching that those educators are expected to replicate.  
“The teachers choose what they want to change, and they have a very structured way to test those changes so that we can learn across contexts which changes actually lead toward improvement,” Burt-Kinderman said.
Currently, the program serves mathematics teachers in Pocahontas, Grant, Fayette, Mineral, Randolph and Gilmer counties. Campbell and Burt-Kinderman hope to implement this model in more counties throughout the state, with the ultimate goal of affecting the success of students in mathematics classrooms statewide.
“We want to see how this vision of teacher collaboration and teacher improvement can scale,” Campbell said. “This funding from the Benedum Foundation allows us to learn from these initial efforts working with teachers in their local contexts and as a network across the state.”