PIEDMONT - Wednesday was the first meeting for newly-elected Piedmont mayor Paula Boggs, but a quorum of elected officers was not present and because of this, there were no decisions made and no votes taken.

By Jean Braithwaite
Tribune Correspondent
PIEDMONT - Wednesday was the first meeting for newly-elected Piedmont mayor Paula Boggs, but a quorum of elected officers was not present and because of this, there were no decisions made and no votes taken.
Boggs did say that at the July 24 meeting for the town council several business items will be presented, including the appointment of the council members to their officer’s positions, including finance, water, streets and roads, building, and parks and recreation.
Boggs said that former mayor Ben Smith had communicated with her with a request that he be able to continue to be involved with the water project.
He had been working on the project of making sure water is available to the citizens of Piedmont, with this concern brought on by the closing of Verso.
Because of this situation, Boggs recommended that Smith be appointed to the council as the water commissioner.
Council member Paul Coleman did bring two concerns to the other elected officials, with the first one dealing with the community’s blighted properties.
“It is high time to put our foot down,” he said, mentioning the numerous properties in Piedmont that have excessive weeds growing in the yards.
His thoughts of tackling such an undertaking of cutting the weeds would be to “hire someone to cut the weeds, find out the owner of the property, and send them the bill.”
Referring to the blighted properties, Coleman said, “The rest of Piedmont should not have to suffer with the owner’s eyesore.”
He added that he was not sure the legal process “to go on the properties” to make them look presentable.
The other concern Coleman brought before the council was about the Back Street playground area, “with all the drugs and whatever back there,” and, “we need to put a stop to that.”
“It took a long time to get that playground and citizens should not be allowed to tear it up,” he said.
Coleman then mentioned the handicapped swing that was installed at the Back Street playground, and he said that at the present the swing cannot be used
“There is a hole about a foot deep under the swing,” he said, adding that he thought the swing was for those handicapped only, while others are using that part of the playground.
Coleman spoke about the ownership of part of the playground, when he said that he brought some of the property from the late Norm Layton, and, “Then I donated that to the town of Piedmont.”
“The citizens should respect that property,” he said.
The town’s maintenance supervisor, Ernie Crouse, was present at the town meeting and he said that he will undertake the repair of the handicapped swing