KEYSER - Mineral County commissioner Jerry Whisner, whom Keyser mayor Damon Tillman has accused of “causing the city to go bankrupt” because of the money owed to the city by the New Creek Public Service District, said Monday the PSD has “steps in place … to meet our obligation to the city.”

By Liz Beavers
lbeavers@newstribune.info
Tribune Managing Editor
KEYSER - Mineral County commissioner Jerry Whisner, whom Keyser mayor Damon Tillman has accused of “causing the city to go bankrupt” because of the money owed to the city by the New Creek Public Service District, said Monday the PSD has “steps in place … to meet our obligation to the city.”
Whisner was appointed by his fellow commissioners to serve on the PSD board in April and serves as its chairman.
According to Tillman, as of June 12, “New Creek owes $269,000.” The city has had to borrow money from the general fund to keep the sewer department in operation.
City finance commissioner Mike Ryan said last week, “As of June 20, the sewer fund owes the general fund $224,933.”
“We are aware of their financial difficulties and we hope to make a substantial payment (to Keyser) within the near future,” Whisner said Monday.
Whisner’s full statement is as follows:
“The New Creek Public Service District has experienced more than their share of problems over the past few years due to mismanagement, embezzlement, out-right theft, unauthorized spending, lack of maintenance on the system, no periodic rate increases and above normal rainfall - all this has contributed to the current financial situation we are in,” he said.
“When the Mineral County Commission was made aware of their situation approximately a year and a half ago, we appointed board members we thought would steer the PSD in the right direction, but the problems facing these new board members were so daunting that they quickly realized that the $150 per meeting they were paid was not near adequate and quickly resigned.
“At the April 9 commission meeting, I was appointed to the NCPSD board as an uncompensated member, joining current board members Melissa Rotruck and Luke Hoover. Since that time we have made progress in getting our affairs in order, trimming expenses and making repairs on our infrastructure,” Whisner said.
“Getting NCPSD on solid footing is proving to be a monumental task, but I am confident that it will be done. We want what is best for our customers and keeping NCPSD intact is the best thing right now.
“We have steps in place to meet our obligation to the City of Keyser. We are aware of their financial difficulties and we hope to make a substantial payment within the near future.
“The financial success of Keyser is important to Mineral County and it is my hope that the city will prosper.”