CHARLESTON - Following the news by the state transportation officials of the upcoming first segment work on the Tier II study for the U.S. 220 Corridor Project, another item of good news was announced during Mineral County Day.

By Jean Braithwaite
Tribune Correspondent
CHARLESTON - Following the news by the state transportation officials of the upcoming first segment work on the Tier II study for the U.S. 220 Corridor Project, another item of good news was announced during Mineral County Day.
Gregory Bailey, highways engineer, told the group from Mineral County that a traffic light is set to be installed at the intersection of Route 220 on Mineral Street and State Street.
Len Colelli, president of Potomac State College, had previously given his concerns to the highways department for the “safety issues” for students crossing the roadway to attend classes and other functions.
The students crossing the state route are those living in the dormitory in the former Potomac Valley Hospital building.
Bailey said the original plan was to place a light at the Fort Avenue and Mineral Street intersection, but it was recently changed to State Street.
Colelli said the change would work well, because, “Most of the students cross at State Street.”
Dave Vanscoy was the spokesperson for the county delegation, and he asked the transportation people to “concentrate on several items” for Mineral County roads.
He started with the project dealing with the WV Route 956 and Route 28 intersection at Short Gap.
“It was a stoplight, and then went to a roundabout,” Vanscoy said, wanting to know just what will be installed at that particular intersection.
Bailey said that a design for an additional right-of-way was happening, causing an increase in funding for the roadwork, but, “there will be a traffic light.”
Vanscoy inquired about any progress on the Carpendale Bridge Project, and Bailey said, “Nothing has been done.”
John Lusk wanted to hear an update from Bailey on the roadway curves on Route 28, near Scenic Lane, saying that a recent auto accident in that area resulted in three fatalities.
Terry Liller recalled that two years ago, in a conversation with Paul Mattox, secretary of transportation, there was an understanding for a completion of a study on safety concerns on Route 28.
Bailey said, “The highway officials will go back and look at the data,” adding that an accident study showed “accidents were below the state average” along Route 28.
Lusk also brought to the table discussion of the vertical curve on Route 46 between Piedmont and Keyser, as he said this was an ongoing agenda item for Mineral County Day.
Speaking to Bailey, Lusk said, “It would scare you to travel over this road,” adding that a school bus and a car cannot meet on this curve.
Bailey said about the Route 46 vertical curve, “This is not a high priority project.”
Vanscoy did not have an opportunity to approach the subject of the Nancy Hanks cabin, but spoke on it prior to the transportation meeting.
He said that a gate blocks the preserve where the cabin is located, and the fence is located on state road property.
Saying the cabin is symbolic of the birthplace of the mother of a United States president, Vanscoy said, “Even Sen. Robert Byrd was a visitor to the site.”