RIDGELEY – Infiltration from a manhole has contributed to an extraordinarily large sewer bill for the Town of Ridgeley to the City of Cumberland.

By Ronda Wertman
Tribune Correspondent
RIDGELEY – Infiltration from a manhole has contributed to an extraordinarily large sewer bill for the Town of Ridgeley to the City of Cumberland.
Officials this week noted that Cumberland is working on an issue with its flood gates concerning the storm water infiltration, but that an adjacent manhole is also a culprit.
To mitigate the manhole will cost the town an estimated $2,700 as it is relined and sealed to prevent infiltration, but water and sewer commissioner Duke Lantz says that it will save the town money in the long run.
Commissioner Nick Imes reported the recent trail meeting held in conjunction with Carpendale to extend the rail trail to link with Cumberland.
Imes said the next step for Ridgeley is to seek a letter of agreement with Cumberland for use of the top of the levee for the trail.
In his report, police chief Jake Ryan reported 53 calls for October, including four arrests, trespassing, a well-being check, sexual assault, breaking and entering, warrant served and 15 traffic citations.
In addition, officers participated in special details for Halloween and the demolition of the school.
Ryan also presented a tobacco free policy for the department.
In other business, Ridgeley joined towns and counties throughout the state in joining with Governor Jim Justice’s proclamation for Christian Heritage Week Nov. 18-24.
In his continued effort to streamline the town’s ordinances, Imes is looking to update the book itself along with many of the ordinances.
The council passed the second and third readings of the camping ordinance, which prohibits camping within the town boundaries, including acts of daily living in a temporary dwelling or non-permanent structure on land owned by the town or on private property without the permission of the property owner.
The first reading was held on the parking ordinance, which prohibits parking or driving on the sidewalk unless it’s the sidewalk owner, who is allowed to drive or park for loading and unloading only. The second reading will be held at the Dec. 11 meeting.
The council tabled action on a scrap metal ordinance aimed to target automobiles, parts and junk on properties or in buildings where it is a risk to health and safety; the storage of construction materials for extended periods and abandoned vehicles.