CARPENDALE – Carpendale will take the next step in paving the way for the new bridge as the council holds the second reading to change the zoning on the CSX property from light industrial to commercial next week.

By Ronda Wertman
Tribune Correspondent
CARPENDALE – Carpendale will take the next step in paving the way for the new bridge as the council holds the second reading to change the zoning on the CSX property from light industrial to commercial next week.
“We’re making headway,” said mayor Casey Lambert, explaining that having businesses interested in developing the CSX property will help with the bridge project.
The CSX property was not originally zoned commercial when the zoning was implemented in town because the railroad was still operating there at the time.
Since taking office in July, Lambert has been adamant that the town needs to grow and businesses wanting to move to Carpendale can help drive efforts for funding the bridge.
“It’s a safety factor for the town,” he said of the proposed bridge to Bowling Green,  adding that it’s also a benefit for business and the tax base.
Residents questioned what types of businesses would be interested in Carpendale and commissioner Butch Armentrout assured them, “We’re not going to let anything come in here that’s going to hurt the town.”
The zoning is just a first step and future development will have to look at infrastructure and a variety of concerns.
Armentrout noted that the town has the capacity for an additional water storage tank and that a request to an additional tank has been submitted to the Region VIII Planning and Development Council.
 “My job in this town is to enforce the ordinances,” Lambert said as the council passed resolutions addressing disorderly conduct and clarifying the role of the police department in addressing abandoned vehicles.
The disorderly conduct resolution specifies that those disturbing the peace in a noisy or boisterous manner between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. are in violation whether it’s a horn, radio, loud speakers, etc.
“It had to have a time for the police to enforce it,” Lambert said.
The abandoned vehicle resolution says that no person can abandon a vehicle on property that they do not own or control.
 “He (Ridgeley Police) wrote a bunch of tickets. The way to get people to move and to do things is to hit them in their pocketbook,” Lambert noted, adding that it’s a lot of hard to work to address these vehicles.
As residents expressed concern for the culvert on the state highway needing cleaned, Lambert urged them to contact the West Virginia Department of Highways.
An issue with the culverts is that homeowners would be responsible for putting in and keep clean the required 18 inch culverts needed at each driveway.
“Anyone who lived her before 1990 can see how far we have come,” said Armentrout.
Lambert echoed this sentiment saying, “We have a lot out here to be thankful for.”