CHARLESTON - Two staff members of the Mineral Daily News Tribune were honored Saturday with editorial awards during the West Virginia Press Association's Better Newspaper Awards banquet.

From Staff Reports
CHARLESTON - Two staff members of the Mineral Daily News Tribune were honored Saturday with editorial awards during the West Virginia Press Association’s Better Newspaper Awards banquet.
The awards recognize outstanding editorial achievement by the state’s newspapers over the past year, and publications compete in divisions based upon circulation.
The News Tribune is in Division 2, which includes newspapers with circulations up to 16,000.
Staff writer Barbara High earned two first place awards - one in the category of Service to the Community for the Naloxone training which the News Tribune hosted under her direction last year, and one for Best News Feature for her story “A Slave to her Addiction,” which told the stark story of a local woman’s addiction to opioids.
The contest judges called the Naloxone training “A worthy effort,” saying the newspaper had utilized “an unexpected approach, and yet completely in line with the newspaper’s mission of informing the public.”
Of the news feature, the judges called it “a sobering look into the life of an addict, an all too common story in West VIrginia and across the region. It’s a local story, but it tells the tale of thousands.
“These are stories that newspapers were made to tell.”
High has been with the News Tribune for six years, and worked as a stringer prior to that.
Managing editor Liz Beavers received a second place award in the Best News Feature category with “K-9 Officer helps fight drugs on Potomac State campus,” based on an interview with PSC Police Sgt. Mike Cannon and his dog Aria, who has since passed away.
Of that story, the judges said, “A fun story about an aspect of campus life/police life that doesn’t get much attention except when the arrest is made. Good, humanizing story.”
Beavers has been back at the News Tribune for ten years, and has been working at local newspapers for a total of 37 years.
“Our annual newspaper competition always brings out the best of our state’s newspapers and journalists have to offer,” said Don Smith, executive director of the West Virginia Press Association.
“From the largest daily newspaper to the smallest weekly newspaper, West Virginia residents benefit from the outstanding and dedicated work of journalists throughout the state. Community journalism remains the centerpiece of the newspaper industry in the Mountain State. The West Virginia Press Association is proud to recognize and honor the excellent work produced by West Virginia’s terrific newspapers and journalists.”
A total of 36 newspapers submitted nearly 1,700 entries in the 2018 contest.