KEYSER - Keyser EMS has turned in its audit to the Mineral County Commission - over two months after being reminded that it was overdue.

By Jean Braithwaite
Tribune Correspondent
KEYSER - Keyser EMS has turned in its audit to the Mineral County Commission - over two months after being reminded that it was overdue.
Steve Rexrode, president of the Mineral County Ambulance Authority, brought the issue and one other to the attention of the commissioners during their meeting on Tuesday.
He first spoke concerning the EMS, saying that he understood, “The Keyser ambulance has turned in their audit.”
Jerry Whisner, commission president, told Rexrode that the Keyser EMS had complied with the request for an audit, and in addition, as new leadership has stepped in for the local ambulance service, “We had the audit in one week.”
In late December, the commissioners agreed to send a letter to the Keyser EMS, showing the emergency squad could be penalized if an up-to-date audit was not completed within a short time. The commissioners had voted in August to require all fire and EMS companies to have an audit performed every three years.
As of that December notification by the county commission, however, all other ambulance services except Keyser had complied with completion of an audit.
Rexrode said that with the Keyser EMS moving forward to be in accordance with the submission of an audit, “There will be no penalty for them.”
The second item of concern he spoke about to the commission members was the Truck Committee that is part of the Mineral County Ambulance Authority.
Rexrode said, “The Truck Committee needs to get together to make plans” on how to replace or repair county ambulances.
He said the members of the Truck Committee do not need to be part of the county ambulance authority, as he named Tom Valentine, of New Creek, who met those specifications.
Dusty Amtower, chief of New Creek Volunteer Fire Department, said, “There has to be some criteria” for the reason for replacement of an ambulance.
Rexrode added that the Truck Committee “could decide how to rotate ambulances” throughout the county.
Chris Guynn, a member of the ambulance authority, said, “This county has the best ambulance feet in the state.”
He also mentioned that with fewer ambulances for the county, “We could give each of the squads more funding.”
In other business, an announcement was made of a new hire for the Community Corrections.
Out of 11 applicants, with six of those interviewed, Katie Blankenship was hired as a case aide.