PIEDMONT - Piedmont and the town of Poca, in Putnam County, West Virginia, have several similarities, including both having about the same number of people living in their communities.

By Jean Braithwaite
Tribune Correspndent
PIEDMONT - Piedmont and the town of Poca, in Putnam County, West Virginia, have several similarities, including both having about the same number of people living in their communities.
Each has ust below 1,000 residents, each is located in rural areas, and each has a mayor and five council members for the operation of their towns.
At the Friday evening government meeting in Piedmont, and during the police report, part of the discussion showed that one more item will connect the two communities, in that Poca gave one of their town vehicles, free of charge, to Piedmont.
Robbie Smith, police chief, said that in late November, an email came through to Piedmont, along to other statewide municipalities, that Poca wanted to give away two of their town vehicles to a municipality that could put them to use.
Poca town recorder Jolita Raine said that the county state police “put the word out to the state’s communities” of the availability of a Chevrolet Impala and a 1999 Jeep Cherokee.
Raine explained why the two were available to any community, when she said that about four years ago the Putnam County officials “sold us a Crown Vic for $1,” which she mentioned continues to be in service for Poca.
Then she added that within the past couple of years, “An influx of B&O Tax came into the town, due to the construction of a new middle school.”
With that extra funding, Raine said that Poca bought a Ford Interceptor, and then with four vehicles on the town fleet, the local officials opted to get rid of the Chevrolet and Jeep.
She said that when receiving notification from Piedmont about needing the four-wheeled drive Jeep, “The Poca mayor and council voted to give the Jeep to them.”
“I was glad to see the mayor and Mr. Smith come down here to get the vehicle,” Raine said.
R. Smith said that Piedmont needed a four-wheeled drive to give assistance “up on the hill” when the weather was severe.
He said about the Jeep, “You can’t bet free,” as he mentioned, “It will be on the road as soon as we get lights and sirens installed, and a radio in it.”