KEYSER - The Mineral County Technical Center held an open house on Tuesday, Nov. 7, from 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Parents and students, as well as members of the public, toured the building, spoke with teachers and students, and
observed the many facets of the vocational education available at the Technical Center.

By Marcia Conrad
Tribune Correspondent
KEYSER - The Mineral County Technical Center held an open house on Tuesday, Nov. 7, from 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Parents and students, as well as members of the public, toured the building, spoke with teachers and students, and
observed the many facets of the vocational education available at the Technical Center.
According to principal Lois Spencer, the open house was successful and well received.
At the Technical Center students can begin preparation for a career in several trade areas. Teachers can help them obtain various certifications and get on track for career success.
Several groups had items on display and some groups had items made at the center for purchase by the public. Among the items for purchase were several fidget spinners, key chains, and novelty items which had been made on the 3-D printer in the ag mechanics lab.
Instructor Jim Spurling and his students have made various items using this impressive technology. Among the other things built in Spurling's class is a desk-top computer in a clear acrylic case complete with flashing lights.
Spurling also teaches computer repair and his students must diagnose the issue and find a solution.
In the carpentry shop, Steve Willison had on display two hunting sheds which the students have built and are almost ready to move. The sturdy sheds have already been
sold, and Willison reported that he had to turn down others who wanted the sheds because of time constraints.
Other career training options at the Technical Center include automotive mechanics. In the mechanic shop, instructor Ian Saville guides his students through all phases of automotive repair, including a nearly total restoration of a vintage muscle car.
Saville has his students diagnose the problem, write work orders, and call to order parts just as they will do in their future careers.
DECA students Autumn Heavener and Caitlin Baker were on hand to explain the club. DECA has a nearly 70-year history and is a comprehensive learning program which prepares leaders and entrepreneurs in marketing, finance, hospitality, and
management. DECA students have been making presentations at Keyser Middle School and Frankfort Middle School to promote the Technical Center. This is part of their
public relations project that they will use as part of of the DECA state competition in March.
Health occupations seniors are currently getting prepared for industry through training at various occupational work-sites including Piney Valley, Potomac Valley Hospital, Progressive Physical Therapy, Dr. Ludwick, Dr. Fiorentino, Rehab First,
Hamilton and Staggs Dental Lab, and E-Cell. Each intern gets approximately 55-70 hours of clinical time each semester.
The nurse assistant class is preparing to take the state exams for WV certification. Juniors and sophomores are busy learning about various health careers and systems as well as obtaining certifications in CPR and first aid.
The Mineral County Technical Center is a multi-faceted learning program tailored for the trades and careers of the 21st Century. Many students leave the programs ready for a career or to pursue further education in their career path. There are other programs offered at the Technical Center, including a trout system and a greenhouse which opens for the public every spring.
Next semester the Technical Center will also offer a class in small engine repair.
Spencer says she is excited about the future of the Technical Center. Many of the Technical Center students have won state and national competitions in their fields.