PIEDMONT - A discussion at the Piedmont Council meeting on Wednesday evening could allow for the donation of a building with the deed signed over to the town.

By Jean Braithwaite
Tribune Correspondent
PIEDMONT - A discussion at the Piedmont Council meeting on Wednesday evening could allow for the donation of a building with the deed signed over to the town.
Mayor Ben Smith said that the structure housed the William Mansfield’s Barber Shop until recently when Mansfield, a well-liked citizen of the community, passed away.
Smith said he had been contacted by Mansfield’s daughter, Rose Mansfield, and she wanted to know if the town “would accept the donation of the house.”
She did have a stipulation that came with the house being deeded to Piedmont, and that was that she would be able to live in the upstairs apartment.
R. Mansfield does not presently live in the community, but mentioned to Smith that she “may retire to Piedmont,” and during other times be in the apartment several weekends a year.
Commissioner Paula Boggs wanted to know if the building, located on the corner of Green and Third streets, could have the barber shop area remain intact “to honor Bill.”
She gave credit for the influence of the late Mansfield on a young Piedmont man, who is now attending barber school.
Smith said, “The barber things and contents are gone.”
Commissioner Vicki Smith had a suggestion for the building, saying, “We could use the space for council meetings.”
Commissioner Rick Butler had a concern in the town receiving a building as he said, “Can we afford the maintenance,” adding such items as keeping up with the roof of the structure, along with plumbing and electrical needs.
Smith asked for a motion to give him the authority to pursue the project of the donated property and the legalities involved until the next council meeting, when the discussion for approval of acceptance of the house could happen.
The council members agreed on the motion, and Smith said that he had at least one thing to say about Mansfield, and, “He was a mountain of knowledge.”
In other business, commissioner Susie Clark announced that the community’s Trunk-or-Treat will be held for the local children on Tuesday, Oct. 31, from 6-8 p.m., at the city parking lot, located behind the American Legion.
She said that donations of candy or money will be accepted at the town building or at the Pit Stop.
Although in the early stages of planning, Smith is pursing holding a service in 2018 to remember 9/11.
She said that among the activities during the service may include a parade, with a time to remember the military, first responders, and ambulance personnel.
Mayor Smith said that the event would be good for the community, because, “Patriotism has gone out the door.”