Lieutenant H. B. Martz, commander of the Cumberland barracks of the Maryland State Police, was present at the recent town of Westernport council meeting to give an update for the area.

 Lieutenant H. B. Martz, commander of the Cumberland barracks of the Maryland State Police, was present at the recent town of Westernport council meeting to give an update for the area.
He briefly gave statistics of what is happening in Allegany County with the expanding opioid crisis, which he said, “drives up the crime rate.”
Martz cited that as of September 1, and in the county, “There has been 162 heroin overdoses,” and among those numbers 25 deaths.
He added the crisis is a common and a real problem, and, “It is affecting us all,” because the facts show 80 percent of the crimes in the county are tied to the heroin epidemic.
“I am not here to solve this issue,” Martz said, “I am here to talk about Westernport.”
He said that in the past 248 days, there has been 228 issues calling for law enforcement to be in the community.
To those present at the town meeting, he said, “You call, we come,” as he added crimes are solved through police presence and vigilance.
Mentioning a neighborhood watch-type program could be utilized, but, “It takes a lot of involvement and a lot of people to make it work.”
Martz told about the Allegany-Mineral Counties Crime Solvers, and said to the Westernport citizens “If you see something then say something,” by calling the hotline number at 301-722-4300 or a toll-free number at 877-722-4307.
Several citizens attending the town meeting voiced problems they have observed in the community as seeing pills being peddled, robbery taking place in broad daylight, a disturbance during an outdoor birthday party, and ongoing harassment from a neighbor.
Martz said, “We want no one in harm’s way,” and suggested to the citizens when they see anything that could be breaking the law to call 911, and that call will be directed to the proper area as state police, sheriff’s office, or an ambulance service.
He said that he wanted the Westernport citizens to understand, “We care about what happens in this community and all the communities in the county.”