KEYSER - Additional signage has been placed on Chestnut Street in an effort to keep vehicles from traveling the wrong way, but a concrete safety barrier requested for the intersection has been placed on hold.

By Liz Beavers
lbeavers@newstribune.info
Tribune Managing Editor
@lizbeavers1
KEYSER - Additional signage has been placed on Chestnut Street in an effort to keep vehicles from traveling the wrong way, but a concrete safety barrier requested for the intersection has been placed on hold.
Beverly and Jim Chaney, who live at the intersection of South Main and Chestnut streets, had appeared before the Keyser City Council on June 14 to again request additional safety measures for the intersection which Bev said had been dubbed “Crash Corner” by local firefighters.
When the Chaneys originally asked for help several years ago because of the high volume of vehicle accidents on their corner, the portion of Chestnut between Water Street and Main Street had been designated one way, but drivers tended to ignore the signs and turn up the street anyway. With no stop sign at the intersection of Main, the motorists would continue west toward the stoplight at Mineral Street and often wind up being “t-boned” by a vehicle traveling north on South Main.
On two occasions last year, vehicles crashed through the Chaneys’ fence and Bev told the mayor and council they are afraid someone will get seriously hurt.
Saying she wanted to be “part of the solution,” Chaney even presented the council with a “Wrong Way” sign that night which she and her husband had purchased for Chestnut Street.
On June 28, that sign was erected, along with an additional “Do Not Enter” sign. In addition, the existing “No Right Turn” signs on Water Street were repositioned for better visibility.
That evening, the Chaneys returned to the Keyser City Council meeting to thank the city, but noted that the changes were meeting with limited success.
According to Bev, as she was taking photos of the street earlier that day, a vehicle went up the wrong way right in front of her.
She also asked about any progress on placing a concrete-filled post on her corner in an attempt to keep vehicles from traveling onto her property in case of an accident.
City coordinator Randy Amtower told her, however, that he would like to hold off on placing any barrier until NexGen completes its project to put fiber under the city’s streets for broadband internet access.
“Everything on the east side of Keyser is to be underground,” he said. “It might be a little while on the posts until I figure out what’s happening with the broadband. I don’t want to have to bust the sidewalks out twice.”
Amtower said work on installing the fiber is scheduled to begin this month.