KEYSER - The 12 computers used by the county deputies are not working properly and according to Sgt. Chris Leatherman, “There is no memory at all on them,” creating issues in completing mandatory reports.

By Jean Braithwaite
Tribune Correspondent
KEYSER - The 12 computers used by the county deputies are not working properly and according to Sgt. Chris Leatherman, “There is no memory at all on them,” creating issues in completing mandatory reports.
Leatherman, speaking to the Mineral County Commission in place of Sheriff Jeremy Taylor, who was out of town, said in giving an example to the commissioners, “There was a vehicle accident today, and there were reports to do.”
He said involved in the information needing to be downloaded onto the computers are photos, diagrams, and other details of the accident.
Saying that is almost impossible to download a lot of information on the office computers, Leatherman added that three of 12 have crashed, and, “Mine is on the borderline to crash.”
Leatherman said the present computers were purchased during the time when Craig Fraley was sheriff, and, “I am not a tech guy, but the internals have quit working.”
Lauren Ellifritz, county clerk, asked, “Are they all bad?” and Leatherman said, “I cleaned my computer up this morning, defragmented it, and there is not too much improvement.”
Ellifritz did the math to estimate the cost of replacing 12 computers and the price for each was around $550, plus $15 each for shipping, and even more for extra warranty charges.
Leatherman brought up another point concerning the need for new computers, when he said, “We are hoping to get two new deputies, and if they are hired, we have to get them equipped.”
Ellifritz suggested Brian Clem of Global Computer Services look at the computers, and that “is upon the approval of sheriff Taylor.”
She added, “No one will touch the sheriff’s computers without his input.”
Leatherman said that if the old computers could be “cleaned up,” it could be possible to place them in the deputy’s vehicles for usage while out on the road.
The county commissioners approved a motion to purchase up to four desktop computers once sheriff Taylor returns from a trip and he can offer his involvement into the situation.
In other business, for the county commission, Sallie Martin, audit manager of the West Virginia Audit Department, was present at the meeting and gave an exit interview.
She said, “There were no issues,” with the commission audit for the time starting July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015.
Martin named several findings, dealing with segregation of duties in the offices of the sheriff and prosecuting attorney, and the same for Parks and Recreation and the local development authority.
She said about the finding, “This is common in small counties.”