KEYSER- The recent incident that led to an elderly lady being injured and her family pet dying in an apparent dog attack has raised questions about 911 calls and territories.

By Barbara High
bhigh@newstribune.info
Tribune Staff Writer
KEYSER- The recent incident that led to an elderly lady being injured and her family pet dying in an apparent dog attack has raised questions about 911 calls and territories.
The injured 74-year-old woman, Patricia Fiedler, called the 911 non- emergency number in Mineral County because, although the property known as The Preserve at Dam Site 14 is in Grant County, it’s closer to Mineral County.
After telling her story to Mineral County 911, she was informed the incident occurred in Grant County and was transferred to Grant County, where she said he had to tell her story again.
Patricia also stated it took a long time for help to arrive.
According to Mineral County 911, calls made to them will often go through to a different county, especially if it is a cell phone call and a different tower picks it up. When that happens, they have a one-button transfer system to help relocate the call immediately to the correct dispatch.
The other issue concerning territory arose when, as the call came in, a Mineral County animal control officer who just finished a call asked if they wanted him to respond to the call.
Deputy Thorne from the Grant County Sheriff’s Office told the News Tribune that he said due to the estimated time of arrival that Mineral County should go ahead and respond to the situation.
According to a 911 operator, however, when they recontacted the Mineral County animal control officer, they were told  Mineral County was unable to respond to an emergency in Grant County because there was no written contract or agreement with that county.
Thorne explained that Grant County does not have an official animal control officer like Mineral County does, and animal calls are often handled by the Parks and Recreations Department. They have an employee who they refer to as their dog catcher, but who only handles animal surrenders, etc., which require the dog to be tied at the time of pick up. Animal attacks and other issues like that go through the Sheriff’s Department.
Thorne said there is a mutual aid agreement between all 55 counties in the state. According to him, with animal control falling under the Mineral County Sheriff’s Department, he was told that agreement would extend to animal control duties.
Mineral County Animal Control officer Melissa Kidwell declined comment, saying she had no knowledge of the investigation and was not on scene due to it being in Grant County.