KEYSER - A South Main Street resident was back before the Keyser City Council recently, once again asking for help in decreasing the number of accidents occurring at the intersection of Chestnut and Main.

By Liz Beavers
lbeavers@newstribune.info
Tribune Managing Editor
KEYSER - A South Main Street resident was back before the Keyser City Council recently, once again asking for help in decreasing the number of accidents occurring at the intersection of Chestnut and Main.
This time, she and her husband even presented the city with a “Wrong Way” sign which they hope will be placed on Chestnut Street.
Beverly Chaney first appeared before the council several years ago, asking that the city take some action to help improve the safety of what she said one firefighter had dubbed “Crash Corner.”
At that time, Chestnut between Water and South Main streets was two-way and vehicles traveling west on Chestnut often failed to stop at South Main. In addition, the presence of a building right on the southeast corner makes it difficult to see traffic coming north on Main Street.
At that time, Chestnut was made one-way, with vehicles only allowed to move from South Main toward Water Street.
Some motorists continued to travel the wrong way, however, and accidents - although fewer - continued to occur on the corner. At least twice last year, the vehicles came to rest either up against or through Chaney’s fence.
Chaney therefore returned to the council last year, asking that the signage be improved to getter catch motorists’ attention.
Chaney told the News Tribune at that time that “people driving the wrong way on this section of Chestnut Street happens on a daily basis”
After listening to Chaney and examining the area, the council at the time, however, chose to leave things the way they were.
On June 21, Chaney returned to the council meeting - this time armed with statistics and photos mounted to a display board.
Telling the officials “I think there are some things we can do that haven’t been done before,” she asked again for additional signage.
“I think people are looking past those signs on Water Street,” she said, suggesting that a “Do Not Enter” sign be placed on Chestnut Street so it is easily visible.
“There is nothing that tells you you’re going the wrong way once you’ve turned,” she said, adding that many people, once they’ve turned up Chestnut, see the traffic light ahead (on Mineral Street) and just keep going.
“It looks like it’s one long street,” she said.
At that time, she and husband Jim presented the council with a large “Wrong Way” sign which she said was their contribution toward “being a solution to the problem.”
Chaney also asked for a concrete barrier to be placed on her corner, to help keep vehicles from entering her yard and perhaps hurting a family member.
“The fence can be replaced a hundred times, but a life? No,” she said.
Council member Karol Ashenfelter therefore made a motion to place a concrete-filled pole as a safety barrier at the intersection, and council member Eric Murphy seconded it.
The motion was approved.