KEYSER - Wanting to bring a business deal to a final closure, Tomar Inc communicated to the Mineral County Development Authority by letter to seek assistance in a matter that begin prior to late 1984.

By Jean Braithwaite
Tribune Correspondent
KEYSER - Wanting to bring a business deal to a final closure, Tomar Inc communicated to the Mineral County Development Authority by letter to seek assistance in a matter that begin prior to late 1984.
At the Tuesday afternoon meeting of the county agency, Kevin Clark, executive director, told the board members that a purchase agreement was made between Harland Ridder and Tomar Inc., prior to Nov. 16, 1984.
Ridder was representing the Keyser-New Creek Development Corporation, a group that recently dissolved, and the assets of that group is now under the jurisdiction of the development authority.
Clark said the property in question at one time had a straight-line factor, but, “now it is curved,” a change that has taken place over the years on the .03 of an acre plot of land.
He also stated that Allen Markle, president of Tomar, had said, “Things got difficult,” in reference to the small area of property located between a new access road and an old right-of-way and also when Chattanooga Glass Company sold to another container business.
Clark added that Markle was in possession of the original deed, and wanted the development authority to honor the agreement between himself and Ridder.
Clark also said, “Tomar is a good neighbor in the Keyser Industrial Park.”
The board members agreed, “If Mr. Markle pays all the costs for closing, the board will approve the agreement” that was initially started started over 30 years ago between Markle and Ridder.
In other business, Patrick Kirby, director for the West Virginia Brownfield Center, was present at the meeting, and assisted the development authority members in understanding the need to engage the services of a Licensed Remediation Specialist (LRS).
Kirby said the purchase of the old glass plant by the development authority would call for a LRS to review the property, and he added, “I want to make it clear this doesn’t mean there are chemicals in the ground now.”
Clark said, “If we are wanting to develop the glass plant property and get finances,” the bank will ask about this subject, while he added that this process is not required, but, “It is a smart idea to do.”
Kirby said the LRS will supervise the removal of contaminates, if any, from the site, following a site investigation and taking samples of the ground.
Clark said the LRS will determine the findings and make reports to the DEP and the development authority.
Buck Eagle, president of the development authority, stated about the glass plant property, “A clean site is more attractive to market.”
Terry Liller asked Kirby the cost of these services, with Kirby answering  “around $5,000” for the application fee and funding for the work of the LRS.