KEYSER - The Mineral County Genealogical Society will be celebrating the 200th anniversary of one of Mineral County's oldest - and perhaps most overlooked - historical buildings.

By Liz Beavers
lbeavers@newstribune.info
Tribune Managing Editor
KEYSER - The Mineral County Genealogical Society will be celebrating the 200th anniversary of one of Mineral County’s oldest - and perhaps most overlooked - historical buildings.
The McCarty Stone House, located along Keys Street just off Armstrong Street, is a privately owned property and as such is often overlooked during discussions and tours of the better-known historical sites in the county.
It’s history is deeply tied into the history of both Keyser and Mineral County, however, as it was built by the descendants of two of the early settlers of the area - Patrick McCarty and Wendall Millar.
Patrick McCarty was the inspiration for the original name for Keyser - Paddytown.
The McCartys married into the Millar family, and built the mansion on their property, with also included much of what is now Armstrong Street Extended, Keys Street, Millmeadow, Wildcat Hollow, the Keyser Industrial Park and most of Black Oak Bottom.
Throughout the years, the home has changed hands several times, and was used by federal troops during the Civil War as both a hospital and prison.
It was during that time that one of the more interesting stories was forged, according to a paranormal investigator from Winfield, West Virginia.
As the tale goes, three Union soldiers who were being held at the house attempted to escape by prying off a piece of roof. The Southern guards discovered them, however, and opened fire - killing all three.
After the war ended and the stone house was converted back into a private residence, it was said that the “owners could not keep the roof on that room,” Winfield wrote.
“It would always come off at least once a year at the same place, every time,” she said.
The property owners had a lot of work done approximately 10 years ago, however, and the roof is no longer a problem.
The Genealogical Society will be celebrating the history of this great home on Sunday, Oct. 11, beginning at 2 p.m. at the Mineral County Courthouse.
They will have displays on the home, and refreshments.
Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend.