KEYSER — The Mineral County Historical Society made history with its Nancy Hanks symposium. Now area residents have a chance to view the display featuring the resolutions and proclamations that declare that Nancy Hanks was born in Mineral County.


by RONDA WERTMAN
Tribune Correspondent

KEYSER — The Mineral County Historical Society made history with its Nancy Hanks symposium. Now area residents have a chance to view the display featuring the resolutions and proclamations that declare that Nancy Hanks was born in Mineral County.
The exhibit is currently on display at the Mary F. Shipper Library on the campus of Potomac State College (PSC).
Residents are invited to stop by during library hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 on Aug. 19-20. With the return of students Aug. 22 the library will be open Sundays from 1:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursdays from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Fridays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Sundays and evenings are the best opportunities to visit the campus as parking permits will not be needed.
The display will be at PSC until Labor Day when it will begin making its way to other locations throughout the county.
On Feb. 12, 2009, the first day of the legislative session both the West Virginia House and Senate passed resolutions declaring Hanks birthplace in Mineral County.
This sentiment was echoed by a proclamation signed by Governor Joe Manchin.
The historical society went to great lengths to review the research that had been done on Hanks. The society concluded that she was born in Hampshire County, in what is now Mineral County.
In 1929, West Virginia Governor Connelly appointed a commission to review the research on Hanks and the commission found that she was born in West Virginia.
Based on these findings and the research of others, in 1933 a monument was constructed and placed in her honor at her birthplace.
In late 1969, a portion of the Doll farm was sold and the Nancy Hanks Campground was formed. A replica cabin that sat along a Patterson Creek tributary was moved to the site just down from the monument.
Over the years, the cabin has been vandalized with windows broken out, but some of the period furnishing still remain including the mantle and a rope bed.
The property is owned by the Nancy Hanks Homeowners Association and the ground
is part of an environmental trust.
During the celebration of Nancy Hanks, daughter of West Virginia and mother of Abraham Lincoln, a variety of historians and presenters showcased what life would have been like for Hanks.
The symposium was professionally recorded and the society is working to place copies in area libraries to preserve this vital link to local history.